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"For hundreds of years the Caribbean has stood proud. A crossroads of cultures; north, south, east and so sadly west the people came and went. Some by choice, others by force. The culture they brought, the culture they created - Alone they stood. Kaiso Papa praise singing West Indian griots transposed their songs of congratulation to please the colonialist powers, and gentrified Scottish formal dances were turned into raucous party music, while the drums spoke to the African heart and the bastard offspring became the new culture; island culture.. a culture spawned of heat, misery, survival, celebration, rebelliousness, home sickness, healing and happiness. 
Men and women moved from the south and west african latitudes to the great American north to harvest rice, to pick cotton and thence back again to their plantations in the Caribbean. Men came from France to work with Cubans and Jamaicans on the Panama Canal, trading insults and trading cultures. Those men then returned, married.. begat sons and daughters with whom they shared their musical joys, and those men and women in return added nourishment and spice to the ital stew. And boiling over, it fed the masses; it kept them calm. It satisfied them, and their hunger grew. Families separated by hundreds of years now listened to the same powerful radio signals beaming out of Nashville and Memphis and New Orleans; black music, black culture, the black of night. And after a hard days toil, the sound systems come out.
Freedom.
If you don’t believe me, check out Jim Reeves’ LP ‘The international Jim Reeves’ for evidence. Jim truly was international. Ken Parker, falsetto king of Jamaican singers, knew he was international because he was not the only West Indian to love the country music of their country cousins’ southern oppressors. He and Jim were definitely guilty.
"The Drums" they called out across the unfathomable distance of time and memory, and music was born out of love and necessity and the hybridised genetics of influence.
And seventy-two nations were born.
The Jungle is dark. The seas will swallow you up whole and no one will ever know you had troubled yourself to live. Watch out, or the Duppies will get you. Look out for the devil in everything you do. Jamaica has the highest proportion of religious buildings to people in the world. Did you know that? There’s a lot to know about the islands that were once home to pirates. Buccaneers named for the way they barbecued pork. Men only remembered for the name they gave to brands of rum. The music will guide you, let it take you to history, to people, to the lives lived and the struggle to survive…”

Dadawah - Seventy Two Nations
Rico Rodriguez - Distant Drums
Lopez Walker - Fly Away
Heavyweight Dub - Fidel At The Control
Prince Far I - Plant Up
Lennie Hibbert - Rose Len
Jackie Opel - Tears From My Eyes
Blind Blake - Goombay Drums
Missionary Quintet Bahamas - Climbing Up The Mountain
The Congos - Ark Of The Covenant
Burning Spear - Door Peep Shall Not Enter
Carl Bradney - Slipping Into Darkness
Skatalites & Brentford All Stars - Shockers Rock
Alpha And Omega - The Firmament
African Headcharge - Off The Beaten Track
Augustus Pablo - Silent Satta
Wayne Wade - Man Of The Living
Jackie Mittoo - Brain Mark
Scientist - Blood On His Lips
Cornel Campbell - King In My Empire
The Wailers - High Tide And Low Tide
Bahama Lullaby - Roll On My Caribbean Sea
Trini Calypsonian - Poppy Day
Cyril Diaz Orchestra - Tabu
Alerth Bedasse - Farmyard Cha Cha Cha
Edmund White - Jo Jo
Junior Dan - Look Out For The Devil
Churchical Chants Of The Nyabingi - White Boy A Follower
Jack Wilson And Demon Rockers - Chuck It
Vivian Jones - Got A Light
Clint Eastwood & General Saint - Can’t Take Another World War
Early B - Righteous Rastaman
Count Ossie & The Mystic Revelation Of Rastafari - Poem
Karl Bryan - Money Generator
(Unknown)
The Upsetters - The Vampire
Prince Buster All Stars - Trip To Mars
Jackie Mittoo - Ayatollah
Augustus Pablo - East Of The River Nile
Leroy Sibbles - Garden Of Life
Umoja Dub - Cry Of The Destitute
The Ethiopian - When Will Be The End

"For hundreds of years the Caribbean has stood proud. A crossroads of cultures; north, south, east and so sadly west the people came and went. Some by choice, others by force. The culture they brought, the culture they created - Alone they stood. Kaiso Papa praise singing West Indian griots transposed their songs of congratulation to please the colonialist powers, and gentrified Scottish formal dances were turned into raucous party music, while the drums spoke to the African heart and the bastard offspring became the new culture; island culture.. a culture spawned of heat, misery, survival, celebration, rebelliousness, home sickness, healing and happiness. 

Men and women moved from the south and west african latitudes to the great American north to harvest rice, to pick cotton and thence back again to their plantations in the Caribbean. Men came from France to work with Cubans and Jamaicans on the Panama Canal, trading insults and trading cultures. Those men then returned, married.. begat sons and daughters with whom they shared their musical joys, and those men and women in return added nourishment and spice to the ital stew. And boiling over, it fed the masses; it kept them calm. It satisfied them, and their hunger grew. Families separated by hundreds of years now listened to the same powerful radio signals beaming out of Nashville and Memphis and New Orleans; black music, black culture, the black of night. And after a hard days toil, the sound systems come out.

Freedom.

If you don’t believe me, check out Jim Reeves’ LP ‘The international Jim Reeves’ for evidence. Jim truly was international. Ken Parker, falsetto king of Jamaican singers, knew he was international because he was not the only West Indian to love the country music of their country cousins’ southern oppressors. He and Jim were definitely guilty.

"The Drums" they called out across the unfathomable distance of time and memory, and music was born out of love and necessity and the hybridised genetics of influence.

And seventy-two nations were born.

The Jungle is dark. The seas will swallow you up whole and no one will ever know you had troubled yourself to live. Watch out, or the Duppies will get you. Look out for the devil in everything you do. Jamaica has the highest proportion of religious buildings to people in the world. Did you know that? There’s a lot to know about the islands that were once home to pirates. Buccaneers named for the way they barbecued pork. Men only remembered for the name they gave to brands of rum. The music will guide you, let it take you to history, to people, to the lives lived and the struggle to survive…”

Dadawah - Seventy Two Nations

Rico Rodriguez - Distant Drums

Lopez Walker - Fly Away

Heavyweight Dub - Fidel At The Control

Prince Far I - Plant Up

Lennie Hibbert - Rose Len

Jackie Opel - Tears From My Eyes

Blind Blake - Goombay Drums

Missionary Quintet Bahamas - Climbing Up The Mountain

The Congos - Ark Of The Covenant

Burning Spear - Door Peep Shall Not Enter

Carl Bradney - Slipping Into Darkness

Skatalites & Brentford All Stars - Shockers Rock

Alpha And Omega - The Firmament

African Headcharge - Off The Beaten Track

Augustus Pablo - Silent Satta

Wayne Wade - Man Of The Living

Jackie Mittoo - Brain Mark

Scientist - Blood On His Lips

Cornel Campbell - King In My Empire

The Wailers - High Tide And Low Tide

Bahama Lullaby - Roll On My Caribbean Sea

Trini Calypsonian - Poppy Day

Cyril Diaz Orchestra - Tabu

Alerth Bedasse - Farmyard Cha Cha Cha

Edmund White - Jo Jo

Junior Dan - Look Out For The Devil

Churchical Chants Of The Nyabingi - White Boy A Follower

Jack Wilson And Demon Rockers - Chuck It

Vivian Jones - Got A Light

Clint Eastwood & General Saint - Can’t Take Another World War

Early B - Righteous Rastaman

Count Ossie & The Mystic Revelation Of Rastafari - Poem

Karl Bryan - Money Generator

(Unknown)

The Upsetters - The Vampire

Prince Buster All Stars - Trip To Mars

Jackie Mittoo - Ayatollah

Augustus Pablo - East Of The River Nile

Leroy Sibbles - Garden Of Life

Umoja Dub - Cry Of The Destitute

The Ethiopian - When Will Be The End